Awards were presented for Best Paper, Best Student Paper, and Best Demo.

Best Paper Award Winners:

5.1 A Context-Management Framework for Telemedicine: An Emergency Medicine Case Study
Rita Wouhaybi, Ph.D. (Intel Corporation, US)
Mark Yarvis, Ph.D. (Intel Corporation, US)
Philip Muse (Intel Corporation, US)
Chieh-Yih Wan, Ph.D. (Intel Corporation, US)
Sangita Sharma (Intel Corporation, US)
Sai Prasad (Intel Corporation, US)
Lenitra Durham, Ph.D. (Intel Corporation, US)
Ritu Sahni, M.D. (Oregon Health & Science University, US)
Robert Norton, M.D. (Oregon Health & Science University, US)
Merlin Curry, M.D. (Oregon Health & Science University, US)
Holly Jimison, Ph.D. (Oregon Health & Science University, US)
Richard Harper, M.D. (Oregon Health & Science University, US)
Robert Lowe, M.D. (Oregon Health & Science University, US)

Patient care can be intense and stressful, especially in emergency care situations. Emergency care has two parts, field care by a paramedic and in-hospital care. Paramedics often consult with physicians before the patient reaches the hospital. To do this effectively, they must convey the patient’s condition rapidly and effectively. Upon hospital arrival they must also transfer as much patient data as possible to ensure continuation of care. In this paper, we present a context-management framework for telemedicine that is designed to capture sensor data for transfer to a remote location. We further describe an application developed on top of the framework for emergency medicine. We examine design considerations for the application based on collaboration with medical personnel. Finally, we present technical results obtained from use of the technology in simulated emergency scenarios.

Best Student Paper Award Winners:

8.2 Wireless Non-contact Cardiac and Neural Monitoring
Yu Chi (University of California, San Diego, US)
Patrick Ng (University of California, San Diego, US)
Eric Kang (University of California, San Diego, US)
Joseph Kang (University of California, San Diego, US)
Jennifer Fang (University of California, San Diego, US)
Gert Cauwenberghs, Ph.D. (University of California, San Diego, US)

Ubiquitous physiological monitoring will be a key driving force in the upcoming wireless health revolution. Cardiac and brain signals in the form of ECG and EEG are two critical health indicators that directly benefit from long-term monitoring. Despite advancements in wireless technology and electronics miniaturization, however, the use of wireless home ECG/EEG monitoring is still limited by the inconvenience and discomfort of wet, adhesive electrodes.

We have developed a wireless biopotential instrumentation system using non-contact capacitive electrodes that operate without skin contact. The sensors can be embedded within comfortable layers fabric for unobtrusive use. The electrode is a direct replacement for conventional contact electrodes.

The non-contact electrode has been integrated into both a wearable ECG chest harness and EEG headband. We have also designed a compact, battery-powered, wireless data acquisition system to interface with multiple electrodes and monitor patient cardiac and neural signals in real time. In addition, the system also simultaneously acquires signals from conventional Ag/AgCl electrodes to provide a direct comparison of the non-contact electrode’s signal quality.

Demo Award Winners:

Demonstration of WHI-FIT: A Wireless-Enabled Cycle Restorator
Lawrence K. Au (University of California, Los Angeles, US)
Brett Jordan (University of California, Los Angeles, US)
Alex A.T. Bui (University of California, Los Angeles, US)
Bruce Dobkin, M.D. (University of California, Los Angeles, US)
William J. Kaiser (University of California, Los Angeles, US)